Thomson Collection

Commission of HM Queen Victoria appointing Thomson to Professorship at Queen's College, Belfast (MS13/B/2)

Commission of HM Queen Victoria appointing Thomson to Professorship at Queen's College, Belfast (MS13/B/2)

Notes on 'ventilation constructed...about 1870 or 1871' (MS13/F/4)

Notes on 'ventilation constructed...about 1870 or 1871' (MS13/F/4)

'The Way it Was': Sewer at Thomson's house at 17 University Square (MS13/L/5A)

'The Way it Was': Sewer at Thomson's house at 17 University Square (MS13/L/5A)

'The Way it Is': Sewer at Thomson's house at 17 University Square (MS13/L/5B)

'The Way it Is': Sewer at Thomson's house at 17 University Square (MS13/L/5B)

Collection of scientific papers and notebooks, memoranda, lectures, correspondence etc of James Thomson (1822-1892), Professor of Engineering at Queen’s College, Belfast, 1857-1873. Various topics are highlighted in the collection reflecting Professor Thomson’s wide range of research interests. These include such areas as fluid motion, the formation of river bars, ventilation, atmospheric circulation, the atmosphere of Jupiter and the freezing and melting of solid, liquid and gaseous states of matter, which he investigated with his Belfast colleague, Thomas Andrews (1813-85). The collection also includes many manuscript drafts of lectures and scientific papers, printed offprints of papers by Thomson and other contemporaries, newspapers and journals, pamphlets and patent specifications. There are also a large quantity of letters to and from Thomson with about 50 correspondents. These include his brother, the eminent physicist, Lord Kelvin, Michael Faraday, James Clerk Maxwell, P.G. Tait, J.J. Murphy, Thomas Andrews, Galbraith, G.G. Stokes, Sir R. Ball, W.J.M. Rankine and others. Most of this material is of a technical nature. The collection also contains some manuscripts belonging to Thomson’s father, James Thomson, senior (1786-1849).

Strengths

The Thomson Collection is significant for reflecting the research interests, processes and products of an important 19th century Engineer and Scientist. A particular strength lies in the original correspondence that is to found. An extensive series, it contains letters with Thomson's peers and contemporaries discussing technical and theoritical aspects of their respective research interests and work.

Physical characteristics

Paper based collection of published and un-published work, correspondence and lectures etc.

Description or Catalogue

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Collected

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Accrual
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Accrual Method
Donation
Accrual Periodicity
Closed
Added by Queen's University Belfast | Last updated on: 01 February 2018